Author Topic: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.  (Read 2883 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Remley Bishop

  • Sr. Member
  • Species: Hooded Rat
  • ****
  • Male
  • Posts: 356
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2014, 05:21:45 am »
Technically an unstoppable force and immovable object are already breaking laws of physics..  I take it my answer is not really what you're looking for?

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2014, 07:39:04 am »
Well given the fact that even in a deflection, no matter how slight, creates a loss in energy kind of removes the possibility of the force being unstoppable. Especially when that means that if given enough slight deflections that the force would indeed stop.
Mate of WereCat

Offline Yip

  • Species: vulpes vulpes
  • *
  • Female
  • Posts: 3998
    • Furaffinity
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #27 on: September 30, 2014, 09:45:58 am »
What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?
I don't know if either or those is even possible. However, if it were my guess would be that the unstoppable force would simply pass through the immovable object.

Offline Remley Bishop

  • Sr. Member
  • Species: Hooded Rat
  • ****
  • Male
  • Posts: 356
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #28 on: September 30, 2014, 01:18:36 pm »
Well given the fact that even in a deflection, no matter how slight, creates a loss in energy kind of removes the possibility of the force being unstoppable. Especially when that means that if given enough slight deflections that the force would indeed stop.

Well through the law of conservation of energy, energy is never destroyed, it is just converted to another form.  In a normal collision, it would be transformed into motion of the object being hit (potentially also transforming some of the energy into heat or light).  If the force is truly unstoppable, it would not transfer any energy on impact (assuming that an unstoppable force can exist while the law of conservation of energy holds true).  If it deflected but maintained the same momentum in the new vector, it's energy would remain unchanged.

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #29 on: September 30, 2014, 02:57:15 pm »
What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?
I don't know if either or those is even possible. However, if it were my guess would be that the unstoppable force would simply pass through the immovable object.

You got it!! That's the answer!! :3
Mate of WereCat

Online Loc

  • Tea-obsessed transhumanist and Buddhist.
  • Species: Cyborg snow leopard
  • The ending of the words is ALMSIVI.
  • *
  • Female
  • Posts: 4308
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #30 on: September 30, 2014, 03:05:53 pm »
I'm not sure there -is- any -single- correct answer to some of these situations :p

Avatar by Shibara,  sig by Miser

0.1.0 carrot tail leopard gecko, Gelbstoff
0.1.0 bearded dragon, Dany
0.0.1 amel stripe het hypo corn snake, Vivec

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #31 on: September 30, 2014, 03:42:27 pm »
Some, but like I said, not all. This is one of them.

Great job Yip! Conglaturations for figuring it out. :3

*gives celebratory cookie pizza*
Mate of WereCat

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2014, 09:41:00 am »
Let me explain the answer a bit, (sorry for double post but it's going to be a long one.) There is no such thing as an immovable object. In order to make something move you just have to move yourself as it's relative. The object is simply one where no matter how much energy you put into it, it will keep moving,  so if it is traveling at 10 mph, it will always move at that speed even if force is applied in the opposite direction it's moving.

So the unstoppable object is the same as the immovable force. Given that if such an object would exist, in order to not be changed by anything it would have to have an infinite mass and infinite density. According to the properties of such objects they then cannot interact with eachother by changing anything about the other object, so the only possible interaction in that instance is noninteraction, passing through eachother.
Mate of WereCat

Offline Yip

  • Species: vulpes vulpes
  • *
  • Female
  • Posts: 3998
    • Furaffinity
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2014, 10:48:30 am »
*gives celebratory cookie pizza*
Mmm Mmm, pizza made with bits of cookie and celebrities.  :goldthpt:

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2014, 03:30:15 pm »
Now here's an unsolvable one.

No discussion about religion please.

Can an omnipotent being create something so heavy it can't move it?
Mate of WereCat

Offline Furenzied

  • Hero Member
  • Species: Husky/Border Collie
  • kitty ♥ :3
  • *****
  • Male
  • Posts: 5057
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2014, 10:44:15 am »
Forget that last one.

This one just makes me crazy. Are mirrors invisible? Or more like, can you see what a mirror looks like?
Mate of WereCat

Offline Yip

  • Species: vulpes vulpes
  • *
  • Female
  • Posts: 3998
    • Furaffinity
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #36 on: October 08, 2014, 11:53:13 am »
Are mirrors invisible? Or more like, can you see what a mirror looks like?
Mirrors "look like" the things they are reflecting. So yes, you can see what mirrors "look like".  ;)
When you get down to it, how we see what an object "looks like" is by how that object alters the light that reflects off of it. Changing the light's path is altering the light, so as long as we can detect that the light's path has been changed, then yes we can see what the mirror "looks like". In the same way, we can see what a lens "looks like".

However, mirrors can be invisible in the sense that it's possible to use them in such a way that the observer cannot detect the mirror's presence. But it's also possible (and common) to use mirrors where the observer can clearly see there is a mirror there.

Offline Yip

  • Species: vulpes vulpes
  • *
  • Female
  • Posts: 3998
    • Furaffinity
Re: Reasoning in Paradoxical Situations.
« Reply #37 on: October 08, 2014, 01:04:42 pm »
Going back to the thing I mentioned earlier in the thread, "This statement is true" has similar problems to "This statement is false", though in some ways it's worse because it's harder to detect.

The core of the problem with "this statement is false" is that it is completely impossible to determine whether it is true or false; if you test to see if it could be true, it will fail that test, but if you test to see if it could be false, it will fail that test also.   "This statement is true" is also impossible to determine whether it is true or false; if you test to see if it could be true, it will pass that test, but if you test to see if it could be false, it will also pass that test.

In a way, things like this are more dangerous because many people upon seeing that passes the "could be true" test simply stop there and assume that it's true.  To be fair, I doubt anyone has been harmed by accepting "this statement is true" specifically. But in general, accepting that a proposition is true when it has not been properly demonstrated can easily lead to inaccurate beliefs, which can easily lead to harm. For this reason, I think its good to recognize the problem here so you are less likely to fall into it when it can be harmful.