Author Topic: Body Art  (Read 1395 times)

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Offline AussieRoo

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« on: December 15, 2004, 12:22:17 am »
Okay, this has bothered me for a while.  My favorite artist is Jeremy Bernal.  I think he is a god of body art.  The way he draws muscles and bones and curves, everything!  I'm not whining to be like him, but I do have a few questions.

I'm not asking for verbal help or anything, but more of methods to improve this problem of mine (that problem being that I want to be better at drawing muscles, bones, fat, foreshortening, etc)

I know practice makes better (perfection is overrated) but what kind of practice?

Should I draw modelsheets and draw several versions of the same showing different parts, poses, perspectives?  

Do I need to draw from photos?

I really don't know where to start.  I know I need to practice, of all people I should know that.  I'm only as good at drawing as I am because I practiced nightly for a year straight.  Any ideas on practicing methods would help.

Also, the way he does hair is awesome.  I suck at hair and would love to do that.  Just copying the way he does it doesn't help, because it doesn't help me to understand the physics of it, you know?  

Don't get me started on his CG coloring abilities.  I'll never be that good  '<img'>




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Offline Nocte

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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2004, 03:18:04 pm »
I would suggest two things. Get an anatomy book for artists. I've seen "Figure drawing for all it's worth" being recommended a lot, but I don't have it myself. Any book that shows you how the skeleton and the muscles work together and define a body's shape will do. And drawing from photos is also a good idea, to combine theory with practice.

Edit: seems that the book is available online.




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Offline Sskessa

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« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2004, 06:47:55 pm »
I have this one book called "Anatomy for the artist" which is real good. It's good to know how the body works under the skin, to know all the muscles and bones, so you can really visualize what you're drawing inside and out. Also, another thing that has helped me is Edweard Muybridge's photographs of the body in motion.
More than photographs and books, though, try to draw from life as often as you can.
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Offline -SilentKnight-

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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2005, 03:51:47 am »
"I know practice makes better (perfection is overrated) but what kind of practice?"

Practice. Just plain practice. Eventually, after drawing the same thing over and over again, it'll become ingrained into your mind.

Three years ago I couldn't draw a female face for crap. Now I do this freehand - http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v195/SilentKnight2000/ATH1.jpg

The trick is just simply doing it over and over; not the exact same thing, but the same theme. Over time, you'll build up a mental image of what goes where. I know that personally, I can just sit in silence and watch myself draw something in my head, each stroke playing out from memory, even going so far as to make mistakes and erase, because I've so firmly embedded what movements I make while drawing in my brain :P

Improvement comes with time. You'll try something some way, realize it works better than what you were doing before, and you'll keep doing it the new way.

It sounds silly, or even a little abstract to someone that doesn't "have" it, but this is how you "get" it.


"Should I draw modelsheets and draw several versions of the same showing different parts, poses, perspectives?"

Personally, I never do this, but it can't hurt.


"Do I need to draw from photos?"

Photos are great references. Sometimes I'll use one for a complicated drawing; when I just dont understand how to draw some pose or something, I'll find a picture of it and draw off of that.


"Also, the way he does hair is awesome.  I suck at hair and would love to do that.  Just copying the way he does it doesn't help, because it doesn't help me to understand the physics of it, you know?  

Don't get me started on his CG coloring abilities.  I'll never be that good  '<img'>"

There is, overall, nothing particularly hard about the way that Bernal colors his stuff; it's mostly style. The actual process is not that complicated and can be picked up by anyone.

...but translating that process into the smooth style that he's developed is not an easy task. Really, you just need to find your own style. Everyone colors a little differently *shrug*

Offline Kyuzo

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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2005, 12:19:46 am »
Not sure if this is the same book you were talking about Sskessa, but "Human Anatomy for Artists" by Eliot Goldfinger is a very good anatomy book.  I used it all through college.  The book does a great job of showing the bone, muscle mass, and the end result of the actual person.  

Sample page

Some other things you can do are take figure drawing classes, or go to figure drawing sessions.  You can also go to the mall or some other public place and just sit and draw people you see there, although that won't help much with drawing muscle masses.  

Drawing model sheets would help, draw one pose and then try to draw that pose from different angles.  

Pictures are also a great source for practice.
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Offline Kitsuken

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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2005, 05:14:43 pm »
Woo! Someone else who thought of this problem. And here was me thinking I was the only one ^^

I asked about this a week ago or so, and got some reasonable advice. I'll try and repeat what I can of it

1) Do skeletal studies. Muscles can be learned fairly easily, but the skeleton is what holds everything together, so you should learn it.

2) Apply these studies to drawings. Do studies of parts of the bodies you're studying and work out how the bones and muscles fit in. Try to learn things well enough that you don't need a reference for them

3) Try and attend a life drawing group if possible. It'll help a lot with learning to draw anatomy accurately

4) Practice regularly

anyway, hope these help a bit '<img'>

Offline Black Foot

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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2005, 10:36:14 pm »
If I was u get a book of the anatomy and do sum lite sketches and do ur best at it and best of luck @ it.
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