Author Topic: books to learn by  (Read 1476 times)

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Offline Savaaha

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« on: October 13, 2005, 11:58:02 am »
Without my books I cant draw worth squat. I lost all but one book in the hurricane (yours survived Ulario, Id loaned it to Fait) Ive begun replacing my books and so far had How to draw animals by Jack hamm and Freaks by Steve Miller. I used to have a whole slew of books by Lee Ames.
  "Animals" has many great anatomy and fundamental graphics and is easy enough for a un-natural artist like myself. "Freaks" is more advanced with overly muscled anthros and uses the wire skeleton style.

Offline Om

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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2005, 06:07:21 pm »
I have Freaks, which is alright, but not highly instructive. It seems more or less like every other general "How to draw people" book, only with animal characteristics.

The one I honestly use the most isn't a how to draw Furry book at all, it's "Drawing Wildlife" by J.C. Amberlyn. Basically goes over basic wildlife drawing concepts in the first section, then goes through details of each type of animal (from bears to cervines to canines to small mammals, mostly detailing North American wildlife). On each animal, there's a breakdown of key characteristics (from general head shape, to what the eyes look like, etc.) and some drawings. Less of a "How to draw this same drawing I did" book and more of a reusable resource.

There are two other books I use heavily:
"Realistic Pet Portraits in colored pencil" by Anne DeMille Flood is a great resource if you want to learn how to make realistic looking fur in colored pencil. This is more step-by-step demonstration, but if you go through a decent amount of the demos, you pick up on how to blend colors together to create the final effect you want.

"Facial Expressions: A visual reference for artists" by Mark Simon is just what the title implies, a book full of different facial expressions. 3200 black and white expressions... lots of fun.

Then there are the various reference photo books I've picked up along the way on the cheap. One on big cats, bears, wolves, and North American Wildlife. References ARE the way to go!

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Offline NeoFur

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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2005, 08:58:10 pm »
I use How to draw animals too. '<img'>
Two other books I use are "How to Draw Manga Bishoujo-Pretty Gals"
It's good in general cuz I draw manga, and it's got a nice chapter on anthro.
 "How to Draw Manga Occult and Horror" has some awesome stuff for Mythical creatures.

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Offline Ulario

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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2005, 11:58:52 am »
As most of you know, I am for the most part a self taught artist.  I learned through reading books.My list of books I've used to learn how to draw.  THese aren't all of my books... but they are some of my favorites.

1.  "Drawing Cutting Edge Comics" and "Drawing Cutting Edge Anatomy".  Both of which were written by Christopher Hart.  I'll be brutally honest, I hate Chris Hart's personal style, sometimes I wonder how he even became a pro artist.  However, he does know what he's talking about when it comes to drawing comics and anatomy... and thankfully, most of the drawings in that book were not created by him.  The one about anatomy I would highly recommend specifically because it shows the muscles in motion and in different positions.

2.  "Freaks" by Steve Miller.  Like it was mentioned before in this thread, that particular book isn't very informative.  I mainly bought it because I like the clothing styles and the pretty furry pictures.

3.  ANYTHING by Burne Hogarth.  THat man is a genius when it comes to drawing the human body in motion.  A few I'd recommend specifically are "Drawing Dynamic Hands", Dynamic Wrinkes and Drapery", and "Dynamic Figure Drawing".




4.  Comic books are great, too.  They're great for both anatomy and poses.  I have an extensive comic collection, but I have a few favorites.  

"Ascension", which was a small series printed by Top Cow Comics about five years ago.  The artist, David Finch is easily one of my favorite artists of all time.

Anything drawn by the late, great Jack Kirby is also good.  He was wonderful when it came to drawing expressive hands and figures.

Last week, I bought a Star Wars graphic novel (clone wars volume 6).  At the time I bought it because I flipped through it and saw Kit Fisto kicking butt, but it turns out that it had some nice poses/etc... and plenty of action.  I can't remember the artist, and I'm too lazy to get up and look at the moment.


5.  (not trying to be yiffy with this one but...) Believe it or not, another good way of learning is porno mags.  To be honest, I've been drawing the human figure so long that porn does absoloutely nothing for me.  However, one of the reasons that I learned to draw the male form so well is because of playgirl magazines.  Not only does it show good musculature/etc, but some of the less provokative poses in those books are fun to draw.


Another recommendation is to draw books that are specific to things you would like to learn about or draw.  For example, my character Tref uses a three-sectioned staff as a secondary weapon.  I actually bought a used book about proper form and techniques for that particular weapon.
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Offline Enumclaw

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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2005, 12:31:28 pm »
I think there is only one book that I would swear by, and that is How to Draw Lion King.  I think Disney has several of those books that teaches you how to draw their movie characters. Other then that, I mostly taught myself by watching cartoons, and  looking at the art in roleplay books, comics, etc. Plus it takes years and years to get good, I've been drawing seriously since 94, and I still consider myself a crappy artist.

Offline Zyon Foxbird

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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2005, 10:38:35 pm »
Quote (Savaaha @ Oct. 13 2005, 11:58 am)
Freaks by Steve Miller

Definitally one of my favorite books to draw with. I use a website more often than a book to help me though... mostly anatomical problems with the torso and arms.

website i use is bakaneko i'll link if you guys want.

Offline Om

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« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2005, 09:35:11 am »
Quote (Zyon Foxbird @ Oct. 19 2005, 9:38 pm)
website i use is bakaneko i'll link if you guys want.

Please do. I'm always on the lookout for more useful resources.

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Offline Mazz

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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2005, 04:41:23 pm »
Quote (Enumclaw @ Oct. 19 2005, 12:31 pm)
I think there is only one book that I would swear by, and that is How to Draw Lion King.  I think Disney has several of those books that teaches you how to draw their movie characters.

than they sue you for copyright infringment.
*not a fan of disney lately*



I don't use books. I could never understand them. lol  '<img'>
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Offline lordstacker

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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2005, 07:41:59 pm »
':cool:' well my fav books aqre the dk animal ones, got the cat/dog/horse/and animal one-not cheap, but most useful for furry art.
and sure some of the comic ones are good, but only if your drawing comics-or decent ones. but once you buy a good one you will see they all basically go over most of the same things again and again and again......and again
yet one of the other most usefull ones i bought was on perspective

and all these artist anotomy ones-ive yet to find one worth owning and ive colected a lot, too many id say

my opinon
still books are crutch, they show way of doing things. but you need to make your own rules and do it the way you like best.
there is no true wrong or right/its art man

still reffernce never hurts
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Offline rezzit

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« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2005, 04:39:35 pm »
I absolutely agree on the Burne Hogarth note Ulario added. Honestly, he is the only reason I EVER began to draw figures with any kind of ability. In fact, if you go back chronologically in my artwork, I can show you the moment I picked up my copy of 'Dynamic Figure Drawing.' The change is instantaneous and pronounced.

I've got another series of books that I pimp out every chance I get though. I work for an art supply company, and I got introduced to them through our outlet store. It's the 'Virtual Pose' series. They're nude models in a number of different poses shot in a number of different ANGLES. Each also comes with a computer disk that lets you go to ANY angle and zoom in and out as you please. It's the benefits of a porno mag without any of the... uh... porn. There's also a diversity of body types and ages.

http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supply/31835_6210_virtual-pose.asp
http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supply/32968_6210_virtual-pose.asp
I swear by these books now, man.
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Offline RedneckFur

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« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2005, 10:54:37 pm »
Ive got Hamm's How to draw animals.  Its helpful, but his drawings seem blury to me, making it hard to get a good look at his technigues.
Drawing Mamals (author forgotten) has excelent work in it, but doesnt really show how to get to the finished product.

Lee J. Ames books helped me out alot when I was younger.

I like to use wildlife magiznes and product catalouges for reference pics.  I always seem to loose the best ones though  ':blush:'  '<img'>

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