Author Topic: Critique?  (Read 1428 times)

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Offline Sleet

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Critique?
« on: December 30, 2005, 12:46:01 am »
I'm in an awful artistic rut... My notebook is fast being filled with truly awful half-drawn heads that have been scribbled out. If it isn't too much trouble, could someone give me some heavy critiquing of my work? I think it could really help in getting me back on my feet.
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Coloring and white space.... those are being remedied. I'm getting better in Photoshop. What I could really use is critiquing of the lineart.

Thanks in advance '<img'>




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Offline Dragonfox

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Critique?
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2005, 05:02:39 am »
Hm...

Critiques I do best with a specific piece in front of me, but I'll try.

Overall your style's not bad.  The poses seem a little stiff, though.  Also, the drawing seem quite flat.  

Poses are hard to do in general.  Oftentimes it's what I spend the longest time on when I'm working on a piece.  I collect the "How to draw Anime/Manga" books mostly for pose and style references.  "Expressing Emotions" and "Bringing Daily Actions To Life" from the "How to draw Anime & Game Characters" series and "How to draw Manga:  Illustrating Battles" books are generally my must-haves.  Also, "Freaks! How to draw fantastic fantasy creatures" is very good for any artist that draws Furry art.

To improve poses, I would suggest looking for images in comics, mangas, photos, or even other artworks (generally with permission from the artist, or at least a nod to them later on) with poses that you like or haven't tried before.

Here's an example I sketched up:

This is the pose I decided on, the bottom pose of the page of "Bringing Daily Actions To Life" that I've scanned in:


I haven't done a lot of poses with a character lying down, so it will be different for me.  A good pose should look natural and relaxed (unless you're going for a stiff look, like in a military shot).

I'll post my sketches in a progression so you can see a bit of the process I use:





The finished lineart looks like this:



Hopefully that helps.  I find that poses generally work better from references or models.  
Let's take your newest DA entry, "Sleet again".  The pose is very stiff.  When someone is standing, generally they will rest their weight on one foot, so the hips will be slightly tilted.  An arm on the hip is also very rarely straight out from the body.  It will be pointed more towards the back.
If you want, I can draw the image myself to show you what I mean.  I don't want to draw your fursona without permission...  ^_^

As far as flatness goes, generally a good pose and shading will add more depth to an image.  
It seems like you've gotten an idea for shading, but it should be a little bit stronger.  For shading, I generally will use the Burn tool in Photoshop with a large feathered brush, after selecting the area to be shaded with the various selection tools.
Sometime tomorrow I'll see if I can color this pic and get some screenies for you.

A good way to learn better shading is to draw still lives in "dramatic light", or strong light.  For example, a few simple objects in a dark room with a single flashlight or lamp on it.  My art professors have styrofoam shapes for this purpose.  A cube, cone, and sphere are basic and fairly easy.

That's all I've got for right now.  I've got to go to bed...
Dragonfoxes are crafty creatures, although highly protective.  They love a good prank, prefer to be loners, and this one is highly artistic.

Furry Code:  FG[DragonFox]w3acm A++++ C- D++ H+ M+++ P+++ R++ T+++ W Z- Sf- RLA/C a cm++ d e+ f- h* i+ j+ p++ sf-

My DA

Feel free to critique my art at any time!  ^_^

Offline Mazz

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Critique?
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2005, 07:16:18 pm »
Dragonfox I want that book.

got any idea wherei can find it and how much?
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Offline Patrick Rangerwolf

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Critique?
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2005, 07:28:00 pm »
Quote (Dragonfox @ Dec. 30 2005, 5:02 am)
Hm...

Critiques I do best with a specific piece in front of me, but I'll try.

Overall your style's not bad.  The poses seem a little stiff, though.  Also, the drawing seem quite flat.  

Poses are hard to do in general.  Oftentimes it's what I spend the longest time on when I'm working on a piece.  I collect the "How to draw Anime/Manga" books mostly for pose and style references.  "Expressing Emotions" and "Bringing Daily Actions To Life" from the "How to draw Anime & Game Characters" series and "How to draw Manga:  Illustrating Battles" books are generally my must-haves.  Also, "Freaks! How to draw fantastic fantasy creatures" is very good for any artist that draws Furry art.

To improve poses, I would suggest looking for images in comics, mangas, photos, or even other artworks (generally with permission from the artist, or at least a nod to them later on) with poses that you like or haven't tried before.

Here's an example I sketched up:

This is the pose I decided on, the bottom pose of the page of "Bringing Daily Actions To Life" that I've scanned in:


I haven't done a lot of poses with a character lying down, so it will be different for me.  A good pose should look natural and relaxed (unless you're going for a stiff look, like in a military shot).

I'll post my sketches in a progression so you can see a bit of the process I use:





The finished lineart looks like this:



Hopefully that helps.  I find that poses generally work better from references or models.  
Let's take your newest DA entry, "Sleet again".  The pose is very stiff.  When someone is standing, generally they will rest their weight on one foot, so the hips will be slightly tilted.  An arm on the hip is also very rarely straight out from the body.  It will be pointed more towards the back.
If you want, I can draw the image myself to show you what I mean.  I don't want to draw your fursona without permission...  ^_^

As far as flatness goes, generally a good pose and shading will add more depth to an image.  
It seems like you've gotten an idea for shading, but it should be a little bit stronger.  For shading, I generally will use the Burn tool in Photoshop with a large feathered brush, after selecting the area to be shaded with the various selection tools.
Sometime tomorrow I'll see if I can color this pic and get some screenies for you.

A good way to learn better shading is to draw still lives in "dramatic light", or strong light.  For example, a few simple objects in a dark room with a single flashlight or lamp on it.  My art professors have styrofoam shapes for this purpose.  A cube, cone, and sphere are basic and fairly easy.

That's all I've got for right now.  I've got to go to bed...

I recently got the Manga/Anime book for Christmas, and I plan on keeping this book handy whenever I draw.  Another awesome book for poses is Drawing Comics the Marvel Way.  I've bent the spine on that book, I've used it so much.

The best reference for drawing any pose, is real life.  I'm itching for some good figure drawing sessions being offered by the county art society just to keep my eyes and fingers nimble.  If your town's arts council offers them, I highly recommend them.
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Offline Dragonfox

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Critique?
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2005, 11:30:08 pm »
Walden Books or Borders generally carry it.

I've located the Amazon.com pages of all the books I mentioned, so they should be easier for you to find:

Anime & Game Characters Vol. 1:  Basics for Beginners And Beyond

Anime & Game Characters Vol. 2:  Expressing Emotions

Anime & Game Characters Vol. 3:  Bringing Daily Actions To Life

Freaks!  How To Draw Fantastic Fantasy Creatures

The scan is from A&GC Vol. 3, although I highly recommend the Freaks!  book.  The art in it is gorgeous and it has a lot of good tips for Furry drawings.

Also, Mazz, I can scan and email some pages to you if there is something specific you want right now.  Just PM me.  '<img'>
Dragonfoxes are crafty creatures, although highly protective.  They love a good prank, prefer to be loners, and this one is highly artistic.

Furry Code:  FG[DragonFox]w3acm A++++ C- D++ H+ M+++ P+++ R++ T+++ W Z- Sf- RLA/C a cm++ d e+ f- h* i+ j+ p++ sf-

My DA

Feel free to critique my art at any time!  ^_^

Offline titan

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Critique?
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2005, 11:45:24 pm »
i find that the best way to work on poses is to use either a mirror,or take pics of someone in that pose and examine it from different angles
 dunno if thats any help but it might allow you to add some depth to your artwork
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Offline Sleet

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Critique?
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2006, 10:27:47 pm »
That's all very helpful ^^ Thanks so much!

And, actually, I have volume one of that series around here..... somewhere....
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Offline whitedingo

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Critique?
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2006, 04:10:32 am »
Well the main thing you need to inprove on is your anatomy try drawing as if you can see the muscle structure,use ref books as much as possiable.
 Christopher harts books are quite good and fairly cheap on anazon,drawing cutting edge anatomy is one I use quite often and look at how others draw their furrys and try to take your time dont be in a hurry to finish my detailed stuff can take 5+ hours to finish
I'd also say spend more time practicing if you want to improve try to draw at least two hours a day min. Dragonfox covered most the other stuff.
good luck
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Offline Ulario

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Critique?
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2006, 09:08:33 am »
Chris Hart's books are okay... though his personal style isn't anything to write home about.  I'd recommend any of Burne Hogarth's books, especially the one titled "Dynamic Figure Drawing".
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Offline Old Rabbit

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Critique?
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2006, 05:01:52 pm »
Your getting alot of very fine advice..

I only have a little to add that seems to help
me. I try to put my self into the drawing.

Would I lay, sit, stand or run that way.
Could I lay, sit, stand  or run that way.
Remember your character isn't made
of wood or stone.
It has muscles, bones and joints.
So let it relax. Not so much a slouch unless
you wish it..
Do the pose your self.
If it's uncomfortable it will likely
look that way when it's done.

Keeping those ideas/rules in mind when
you start a drawing will help keep the
drawing more believable.

Draw every day 2-3 times a day if you can.
Work on things that give you trouble. Skipping
stuff because it's difficult is a bad habit.

my thoughts.

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