Author Topic: Pages Curling...  (Read 2024 times)

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Offline Banjo

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« on: July 07, 2005, 07:17:42 pm »
I use a drawing pad, that is bound at the top and loose at the bottom. When I draw or especially, color on the same page in it for some time, the two bottom corners will curl upwards and inwards. Needless to say, it's very annoying!

What's even more annoying is my measure to keep the ramant end out of my way! I've started taking a wide strip of paper and taping it to the desk, covering the bottom half of the picture and keeping it down. If I leave it loose, I end up bending the pages, or smearing the pigment, but if I tape them down in this manner, I can't turn the image unless I untape and retape it.

Is there some sort of clamp I can use to put on the bottom half of my pad that'll hold the very bottom of the sheet down and keep it from curling, but not damage the paper itself? Or perhaps something I can take the paper out of the pad and put it in something that'll hold down all the corners, without damaging them?

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Offline Wendell

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« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2005, 08:08:57 pm »
Bull clips, or binder clips like this might help. They're good for keeping a sketchbook together when you draw, or for clipping single sheets to a table or drawing board. They can be purchased inexpensively at any office supply.
You might also think about drafting tape. It looks like masking tape, but isn't quite as tacky. It doesn't leave any goopy glue on the paper when you peel it away. They also sell drafting spots, little circles that are sticky on one side and usually blue on the other. Either one would be available at an art store.
Your paper probably curls because it's cheap, thin, lightweight stuff. I find that anything under 60 pound paper isn't durable enough for the average sketcher. Try Strathmore Sketch, or some other paper, 60 pounds/ream or more.
Bristol board can be purchased in small booklets. That stuff never curls or bends unless you make it, and it is a great surface for pencils, ink, marker, or conte, decent with pastels and charcoal. It's usually 80 pounds/ream or higher, and is available with lots of tooth (cold press or textured style) for dusty materials, or smooth (hot press) for inking.
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Offline Banjo

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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2005, 09:23:53 pm »
Aha, thanks Wendell! I never thought of using a more durable paper! *Smacks self* I use Canson Esuisse Sketch pads, which are only 50 pounds. I've always gotten them because of the smooth paper; I've never been fond of the 'scratchy' stuff. I'll look into those Strathmore, and the bristol board.

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Offline CarLOS

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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2005, 09:26:04 pm »
A drafting trick is to use masking tape. Works well and doesn't mark the paper.

Offline Wendell

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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2005, 10:26:38 pm »
Warnings about masking tape: It's not acid free. It may leave acid-soaked glues on your page, making it turn brown with age. The glues may also attract powder and pigment from your pencil media, collecting colourful smudgies where the tape was stuck... erasing them makes a horrible mess. The glues can also attract oils from your skin, which further brown the paper.

Drafting tape is acid-free, and is supposed to pull away from the paper easily, leaving no glue residue.
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Offline CarLOS

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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2005, 10:45:01 pm »
Quote (Wendell @ July 07 2005, 7:26 pm)
Warnings about masking tape: It's not acid free. It may leave acid-soaked glues on your page, making it turn brown with age.

True!

I forgot about that and the drafting vellum I used it on was specifically designed to resist chemical attack and aging. Thanks Wendell! '<img'>

Offline Dragonfox

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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2005, 11:49:51 pm »
At college, we would use really wide rubber bands to hold the bottoms of pages to the boards.

It would help for if you've got a sketchpad somewhere you can't tape it down.  

The only downside is that the band will smudge things that are underneath it, and if you use a dusty medium like charcoal, you'll get a line from it collecting there.

Otherwise, it's a simple fix.  An office supply store should have wide bands.
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Offline Banjo

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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2005, 02:11:55 pm »
I'll defianatly look into rubber bands as well. I've got two more of my 50 pound pads, and they work all right. I'm going to look into a better paper, but after I've used those up. They're about ten-twelve dollars a pad, and that's alot to decide against using them.

I'm also going to look for the tape we use at school, in my Tech theater class. It's called artists tape (Go figure) and we se it on our light board becasue It doesn't leave a sticky residue. It may be the same as the drafting tape, I'm not sure... Thanks!

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Offline Ulario

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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2005, 10:00:53 am »
Banjo,

I personally don't like drawing pads either since they tend to be too soft for me to draw on... and the whole page curling issue can be a pain.  My suggestion to you would be to buy a pad of computer paper, and a zip-up cloth binder.  

My reasoning behind this:

I find that your standard computer paper actually works wonders for drawing.  I've actually been using it for years and refuse to use anything else.  The surface is nice and smooth and it's much easier to erase pencil from then most sketchbook paper.  I find that on some sketchbook paper, lines don't completely erase.

The binder works in several ways:

1.  It prevents pages from bending.
2.  It protects your art from the elements.
3.  Some of them (like mine) have several different sections so you can organize things better.  I have one section for sketches, on for inked drawings, one for blank paper, etc.
4.  Some of them even have a front zipper for you to store your pencils and erasers in.


I'm not a big fan of sketchbooks, but they can also be useful. I suggest a nice hardbound one.  If you have a B. Dalton bookstore in your area, they sell some really nice ones pretty cheap ($5-$10 depending on the size).  And the ones they sell look really neat, too.  I find that hardbound sketchbooks tend to protect your work a bit more, and you have a nice fancy, professional-looking book to put your art in.  '<img'>

Hope this helps.




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Offline Wendell

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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2005, 03:23:15 pm »
Some good ideas about the loose paper and binders, Ulario. I can't stand drawing on computer paper, but I do often use loose pages (bristol, watercolour paper, textured stuff, etc.)

I would advise against getting any hardcover sketchbooks if you're going to do any scanning or photocopying. The pages don't lie right on a scanner bed unless you break the binding. Better are the ones that have a hard, stiff cover but have a ring binding at top or left edge. My black paper sketchbook is like that.
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Offline Banjo

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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2005, 04:09:33 pm »
Ulario, while I don't have the particular store you spoke of, we do have one called Barnes and Noble, and they have a bunch of hard bound sketchbooks; I'll remember to go and take a look at them... I'll keep the scanner thing in mind though...

I haven't used computer paper for drawing for a few years now. When I first started drawing, that was about all that was available, and I found that at the time, I bore down to ohard with the pencil and it wouldn't erase at all. But now that I have better control and can draw without gouging slivers of paper off, I'll try it again! It may work for me as well, and it's the exact size I need to fit into my scanner. (Then I won't have to take them to Kinkos and get the image shrunk!'<img'>

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Offline Mazz

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« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2005, 01:38:36 pm »
cardstock works well too. I'm currently working on a commission using some card stock a friend gave me. Its not has thick as bristle board but smooth and thicker than sketchbook paper.

kind of like poasterboard in computer paper size at better quality
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