Author Topic: Storyboarding  (Read 1311 times)

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Offline Skunkster

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Storyboarding
« on: December 07, 2005, 08:46:11 am »
Ok, I understand the basic concept of storyboarding. For writing I'd do a set of "character sketches" all written out nicely for each of the major and more major minor characters. Then I'd do a chapter summary, then I start my writing. As I understand it's a similar concept only with artwork.

Um, how do you do that?

Offline Om

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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2005, 09:22:20 am »
Replace character sketches with detailed character sheets for your characters.

From there, take each scene from your writing and break it down into what visuals you want to see. Draw out the setting and then key scenes for it. Kind of like panels for a comic.

Also try googling comic book illustration and whatnot. IIRC, there's a site called Blazedent that's useful.

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Offline Skunkster

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Storyboarding
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2005, 10:17:46 am »
Ok, I've looked around a little and I even have a couple books on it, but I'm just not getting it. Character sheet? When I try to draw out the "imporant scenes" I end up with a page from the novel. How detailed do you go?

Like I said, I'm clueless. ':p'

Offline Om

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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2005, 10:36:17 am »
A character sheet is basically a set character design with details about the character's physical appearance (and sometimes, non-physical characteristics like personality and whatnot) - it's essentially a quick reference guide to that character in graphic form. Here is an example of a character sheet from our own Hockey Raven.

With the storyboards, you can go as detailed as you want to, but generally it depends on what you're planning on doing with the storyboards. For example, if you were making a movie, you'd use storyboards to illustrate how you want certain scenes to look. In your case, where you're thinking of a graphic novel (I believe), you'll probably want to distill your story down enough to be able to easily put it in storyboard form.

Hmm... perhaps think of it this way - when you write a story, it's a mix of descriptives and dialogue, right? You distill the descriptive parts (like "Kai was a tall shepherd - mostly black with some tan - and she was wearing her search and rescue back pack and the rest of her search gear. She seemed to be in silent contemplation") into a picture form of an anthro german shepherd with those colors in that clothing with that look on her face. You convey the scene and mood through the art - then the dialogue is what obviously goes into the word balloons. ^_^

Hopefully that helps clarify - let me know if you need further help.

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Offline Skunkster

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Storyboarding
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2005, 10:41:58 am »
It does help thanks. I'll give it a go and see what happens. '<img'> Drawing out the whole characters will be fun. I have them in my mind, but it would make it easier if they were on paper. '<img'>

Offline Yip

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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2005, 01:17:03 pm »
Quote (kaisilverfire @ Dec. 07 2005, 7:36 am)
For example, if you were making a movie, you'd use storyboards to illustrate how you want certain scenes to look....

Actually, you'd probably go further than that. Especially if it's for an animation or a scene with special effects, then the storyboard would be worked out on a shot by shot basis. Sometimes with multiple boards for one shot if it's needed to make the action clear.  You basically have to go as detailed as necessary to make the story completely clear. That's the point of storyboarding.

For a graphic novel, you would probably want to go through shot by shot as well. Deciding on how you want each picture and the overall composition of each page, including where text will go and so forth.  At this stage though you would probably not be to worried about making the art look really good or filling out all the text (as long as you make sure there is going to be enough room for the text you plan on putting there). The point of storyboarding it is to give you an overall idea of how the final product will be composed before you go into the that stuff. The key here is that the story be clear from the boards. Thats the most important part. That way you'll have a good framework to begin filling in the art and such.





Offline Skunkster

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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2005, 02:08:07 pm »
That's part of why I'm hesitant to write it out first. I'd rather go with what I know the story already is, and shoot from there. I'm almost done with my first character sheet though. '<img'>

Offline Skunkster

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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2005, 06:38:14 pm »
So a character sketch would look something like this:

Fenther

I reduced it as much as I could and it's still big.
This character only appears in the black and white portion, so I had to do some different things with the drawing and can't use shading.

Offline Sskessa

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« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2005, 02:19:53 am »
I've had some experience with this. If you want, PM or IM me and I'd be happy to help, show you how mine look, what I consider important and unimportant when drawing them, etc.

Would type it up but it would take too long. Some short term advice: I wouldn't worry about character sheets. The characters have a tendency to change throughout the story. You'll get a plenty good idea of who they are once you start writing.
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Offline Patrick Rangerwolf

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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2006, 08:45:11 pm »
Quote (Sskessa @ Dec. 08 2005, 2:19 am)
I've had some experience with this. If you want, PM or IM me and I'd be happy to help, show you how mine look, what I consider important and unimportant when drawing them, etc.

Would type it up but it would take too long. Some short term advice: I wouldn't worry about character sheets. The characters have a tendency to change throughout the story. You'll get a plenty good idea of who they are once you start writing.

I agree with Sskessa.  Your characters not may change but will change.  I know with the stories I'm writing, I've re-designed the characters at least 3 times.

Preston Blair in his book Animation wrote a nice bit on storyboarding.  Email me or PM me, and I can scan it for you.  Treat storyboarding like a comic strip.  It's really a visualization of your written words.  That's the best way to explain it.
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Offline Skunkster

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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2006, 12:05:47 am »
Quote (Patrick Rangerwolf @ Jan. 09 2006, 6:45 pm)
I agree with Sskessa.  Your characters not may change but will change.  I know with the stories I'm writing, I've re-designed the characters at least 3 times.

Preston Blair in his book Animation wrote a nice bit on storyboarding.  Email me or PM me, and I can scan it for you.  Treat storyboarding like a comic strip.  It's really a visualization of your written words.  That's the best way to explain it.

I'm there. Thanks. '<img'> The more advice the better. '<img'>

Offline Tensik

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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2006, 09:42:12 pm »
I know this is a bump of an older topic, but if you have any Disney or other animated DVD's, often on the special features they have a section where you can side-by-side the movie with the actual storyboard; you'll learn a lot of exactly how much one is drawn out by watching those.

Another thing I'd suggest if you need to save time is to use "thumbnails" instead of the fully drawn storyboard if you are very familiar with the characters and just need to convey an action change within the same scene.  These would be more like the world's roughest sketch that show movement and the facial expression if necessary, more of a 'smiley face" facial expression.  so if a scene is to take place in a room and pretty much people are just going to be sitting on a couch and talking and you want to storyboard out the script cuts, you can draw just enough to show that it's X person as opposed to Y and where the POV is for the drawing.
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Offline Patrick Rangerwolf

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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2006, 09:47:29 pm »
Quote (Tensik @ Jan. 10 2006, 9:42 pm)
Another thing I'd suggest if you need to save time is to use "thumbnails" instead of the fully drawn storyboard if you are very familiar with the characters and just need to convey an action change within the same scene.  These would be more like the world's roughest sketch that show movement and the facial expression if necessary, more of a 'smiley face" facial expression.  so if a scene is to take place in a room and pretty much people are just going to be sitting on a couch and talking and you want to storyboard out the script cuts, you can draw just enough to show that it's X person as opposed to Y and where the POV is for the drawing.

Excellent suggestion!!!  Thank you!  Thumbnails are the way to go if you don't want to go all the way with movie-style boards.
Patrick Robbins

"Any movie with a "preachy" message, be it Christianity, environmentalism, political positions, or what have you, turns away people because rather than letting the audience figure out for themselves what the meaning is, they are told exactly what they ought to think and usually in terms of slogans and buzz words". ~ Brian Godawa