Author Topic: Local Delicacy Weirdness  (Read 7811 times)

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Offline Kwan

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Local Delicacy Weirdness
« on: January 21, 2008, 09:34:30 pm »
One of the things I don't like about restaurant franchises is that food is becoming homogenized.  It's wiping out local flavors.

So let's chat about our local foods or dishes that out-of-towners consider odd or unusual.   '<img'>

I originally hail from Cincinnati, Ohio. Probably the number one food Cinci is known for is Cincinnati-style chili.  It's a runny, Greek-style chili served over spaghetti & topped with shredded cheese (that's considered a 3-way; you can add beans & onions to make it a 5-way).

It's not unusual to enjoy goetta with your Cincinnati breakfast.  Pork fat, grains, & miscellaneous bits of pork, fried in a pan like mushy sausage.

And no cook-out is complete without mettwurst (like a large spicey hotdog/sausage) and bratwurst (a thick hotdog made with pork products).  Visitors are usually surprised by the flavor of the metts & the grey/white appearance of the brats.
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Offline South Munjoy

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Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2008, 09:54:19 pm »
Here in South Carolina, one of them is Livermush (GAG) which is basically Pork Liver, Rice, and sausage spices. It's intended to be fried and eaten for breakfast, and comes in either sausage form ( in natural casing) or brick form, which is to say, without the casing.

As a transplanted Maine-iac, I can say that I have successfully avoided eating this stuff since moving down here.  

OTOH, I've had Cinci Chili, and I have to say it ain't bad at all, although the addition of Allspice in the version that I had is a bit strange at first.

Offline Kivva

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2008, 12:31:43 am »
First of, South Munjoy... My aunt used to live on Munjoy hill! LOL

I'm also a transplanted Maine-ac. Ayuh.

Well, there's one food that I love that most people haven't tried it the way I prefer it.
Artichokes.

Steamed with butter. I call it the lobster of the Vegitarian world. I love it. The flavour is much richer and distinct than marinated artichokes (YUCK). But you have to wash your hands very well after handling them raw, because they secrete a very bitter 'sap'. Then they have to be steamed/boild very thouroughly to be sure the bitterness has been cooked off.

You peel off each petal and use your bottom teeth to scrape the tasty pale flesh from the tough petal (dipping occassionally in butter, careful! Don't let the butter overwhelm the artichoke) then  discard the petal and move on to the next one. Once you get down to the heart, you scrape away the 'hairy' part of the heart with a spoon (the head of the flower) and then dip the heart in butter and eat that too.

I want one now.... *drool*

The flavour is very distinct, but if I had to choose something sorta kinda like it in a way it would be asparagus. Kind of.

Offline Sskessa

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2008, 03:08:58 pm »
Quote
Artichokes.

Steamed with butter.
Oh yeah, I love steamed artichokes. I like to put a little lemon juice in the butter dipping sauce when I eat them.

Here in Eugene, Oregon, there's something people call "Salad", which is in fact not made with lettuce at all, but with jello. It usually contains some fruit, like maraschino cherries (disgusting), or something wildly inappropriate, like carrots. It's topped Cool Whip and never fails to manifest itself at potlucks. I haven't tried it yet. I don't think I'll ever have the courage.
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Offline Kwan

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2008, 03:52:21 pm »
Here in Eugene, Oregon, there's something people call "Salad", which is in fact not made with lettuce at all, but with jello. It usually contains some fruit, like maraschino cherries (disgusting), or something wildly inappropriate, like carrots. It's topped Cool Whip and never fails to manifest itself at potlucks. I haven't tried it yet. I don't think I'll ever have the courage.

My mother makes a jello salad like that.  Orange jello, finely-shredded carrots, walnuts, and pineapple.
Oddly enough it's rather good (whipped cream is overkill, imho).
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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2008, 06:10:33 pm »
Here in Eugene, Oregon, there's something people call "Salad", which is in fact not made with lettuce at all, but with jello. It usually contains some fruit, like maraschino cherries (disgusting), or something wildly inappropriate, like carrots. It's topped Cool Whip and never fails to manifest itself at potlucks. I haven't tried it yet. I don't think I'll ever have the courage.

My mother makes a jello salad like that.  Orange jello, finely-shredded carrots, walnuts, and pineapple.
Oddly enough it's rather good (whipped cream is overkill, imho).

In North Dakota, where I spent some time growing up between the ages of 8 and 14, they also have the Jell-O Salad. Several variants that I've encountered courtesy of the School Lunch Program as well Catholic Church functions have been made as follows:

1.) Fruit cocktail poured into a pan, after which heated, liquified Jell-O (Pick your flavor) is poured  over it and left in the fridge to do it's thing.

2.) Variant 2 is much the same as the above except after it's been chilled, whipped cream is added, then it's all stirred togeather.

3. Variant three is similar to variant 1, except Fruit Cocktail isn't added, but finely chopped cabbage and carrots are added. It's like dry coleslaw w/o onions or dressing under Jell-O

Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2008, 07:40:34 pm »
man...now I'm hungry for Goetta again ( i spent a couple months in Cincy)

i can't think of a single oddball, here...except weird concoctions involving sauerkraut.

Offline Siege

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2008, 01:00:29 am »
Yogurt cheese is an interesting material.
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Offline Sskessa

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2008, 07:47:19 pm »
Yogurt cheese is an interesting material.

Like paneer? I love paneer...
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Offline Siege

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2008, 08:27:27 pm »
I dunno. I've never had paneer.
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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2008, 09:38:15 pm »
I dunno. I've never had paneer.

You should try eating at Indian restaurants more often.  :)

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2008, 09:01:52 am »
I probably should. Anyway, yogurt cheese can be found in the Cincinnati area, though Whole Foods might also carry it in your area. It's a firm cheese with a mild flavor, good for snacking.  I haven't tried slicing it for sandwiches or topping things, so I'm not quite sure what things it goes best with or how it does when melted.
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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2008, 05:10:44 pm »
I probably should. Anyway, yogurt cheese can be found in the Cincinnati area, though Whole Foods might also carry it in your area. It's a firm cheese with a mild flavor, good for snacking.  I haven't tried slicing it for sandwiches or topping things, so I'm not quite sure what things it goes best with or how it does when melted.

Thry this.... the recipe is for Palak Paneer.

Quote
*500gm spinach leaves *150gm paneer cheese *Peanut oil, for deep-frying *2 tbsp peanut oil *50gm unsalted butter *1 tsp cumin seeds *1 tsp mustard seeds *2 garlic cloves, minced *1/2 tsp red pepper (Cayenne) powder *1 tsp ground coriander *1/2 tsp ground ginger *1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg *2 tsp grated fresh young ginger *1/2 tsp salt, or to taste *1/4 tsp sugar, or to taste *100ml single cream, or to taste *1 tsp garam masala

Wash the spinach, drain, pluck off any tough stems and discard. Wilt the spinach in a large saute pan (there's no need for extra water as enough clings to the leaves to prevent burning at first, then the leaves exude their own moisture). Drain very thoroughly. When cool enough to handle, chop finely. Set aside. Dice paneer into 2cm cubes. Heat peanut oil for deep-frying in a large, deep pan to 180˚C and deep fry the paneer cubes for about 1 minute to seal and lightly colour the surface. Drain on kitchen paper. Set aside.

Heat the 2tbsp of peanut oil and butter in a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan. Toss in the cumin and mustard seeds. Stir for a moment; once they start to hiss, crackle and pop, add the garlic. Fry for a minute or so until golden brown. Add the red chilli powder, ground coriander, ground ginger and freshly grated nutmeg, stirring for a further minute.

Add the prepared spinach and stir constantly over a low heat for 5 minutes. Add the paneer cubes, grated fresh ginger, salt and sugar to taste (add only enough sugar for a rounded flavour; the mixture should not taste sweet). Cook slowly for another 5 minutes. Finally, stir in the cream (adding less or more as suits your taste). Sprinkle with garam masala and serve.

If you halve the amount of spinach, and substitute an equal amount of Mustard Greens, you will have Saag Paneer. Garam Masala is a spice blend available at your local Indian Market.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2008, 05:23:03 pm by South Munjoy »

Offline RedneckFur

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2008, 12:26:55 am »
If you're ever in the far Southeastern corner of NC and order a burger, forget about lettuce and tomatoes.  Here they come with chilli, onions, mustard and cole slaw. If you want different, you'll have to go to a chain store.

We also have or own version of BBQ. Down east, its whole-hog, cooked over a gas fire in an old oil barrel. The sauce we use is a mix of vinegar, mustard powder and black pepper. You either love it or hate it. Its considered to be an aquired taste.

Down east, we put vinegar on just about everything, including veggies.

If its recipies you want, I'll give you one for my favorite food of all. its called Chicken Bog.

You'll need:
1 whole chicken, cleaned and cut. (you can substatute leq quarters and breasts, if you like)
3 links of Pender's smoked sausage (these may be hard to find in your area. If so, substatue with a hard smokes sausage.
2 cups of white rice.
aprox. 1/4 cup of yellow rice (a little goes a LONG way. use spariingly! )
1 chicken boulion cube.
Salt & Pepper to taste.

-Bring 6 cups of water to a boil. put in cut chicken and bring to boil. Add in the boulion cube as well. Add salt to taste (1/4 teaspoon should be fine)  Chicken should be boiled a total of 20 miniutes.
-Slice sausage into disc's aprox 1/3 inch thick.  add to boiling chicken after aprox 15 miniutes of cooking time.
-(After 20 miniutes, you may remove chicken to remove bones and chicken skin, if you desire. Traditionally, they are left in)

Add both white and yellow rice to the water. bring to a boil. Add in black pepper to taste. (i tend to go heavy on the pepper).  Cover and boil on low heat until rice is done. (check frequently! )   Remove from heat and allow Chicken bog to sit covered for aprox 10 miniutes.

Serve in bowls. Sprinkle with crushed red pepper if desired.  Serve with two slices of white sandwich bread and a glass of sweet tea.


Chicken bog is a favored food in the Down East. It can be found everwhere from church socials to hunting camps. (hunters have a habbit of adding onions to the mix as well, something I do not like! ) I've never seen it served in a resturant despite it being a staple food back home. If you want to be 100% traditional, you should cook it in a cast-iron dutch oven.


« Last Edit: June 13, 2008, 12:30:25 am by RedneckFur »

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Offline Kwan

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2008, 05:58:37 am »
::belatedly chimes in::

MmmmMMMMmm, I love Indian food and I adore paneer!

I used to go to Indian buffets with my old roomie at least once a week.  It got embarrassing sometimes, because if the restaurant was being stingy with paneer in something like the saag paneer, the roomie would pick out all the paneer!
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Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2008, 09:38:46 am »
*stifles growling stomach*

ya know, I think I'd take that carolina burger...sans coleslaw.
personaly. mine's straight up BBQ sauce and onions on the burger...sometimes on a Bacon Cheezeburger.

how about this one my step-father came up with?

he slices hot peppers into rings, seeds and all, then boils them in several bottles of italian dressing, and sticks it in a gallon glass jar.  they keep for a year, and stay crunchy, apparently.

how come I haven't heard a word from our nothern neighbors, yet?  mabey the Canadians got something yummy/weird.

Offline Melyn

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2008, 11:01:29 pm »
 (: Here we have fried alligator with gravy and rice. I'm not sure if that's odd, but we have it! We also have deer sausage served with fried turkey.
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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2008, 08:58:14 pm »
(: Here we have fried alligator with gravy and rice. I'm not sure if that's odd, but we have it! We also have deer sausage served with fried turkey.

Would I be correct in assuming that you're from Louisiana?

Here's a party sized recipe for a dish common throughout the US, but known in New England as American Chop Suey:

5 pounds of hamburg meat (IE, one of those logs of ground beef)
1 quarter cup of Worcestershire sauce ( Pronounced Woostah, like Worcester, Mass)
1 half bulb of garlic, finely chopped
1 medium onion, diced
1 or 2 Bell Peppers, seeded and diced
4 heaping tablespoons of basil
3 heaping tablespoons of oregano
5-6 bay leaves
1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 heaping tablespoon of Chili Powder
1 teaspoon of paprika
1 half tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

Fry the hamburg meat in a LARGE pot, and add all of the above spices except the bay leaves, and cook the mixture til the meat is done. To this, add:

3-4 large cans,(or one #10 can) of whole tomatoes, who's juice has been strained, separated, and blended with:

3-4 small cans (or two 16 Oz cans) of Tomato paste.

Stir the mixture well and let it simmer an hour or two.

In a sufficiently large pot (Divide this into a couple of pots, if your pots are too small) boil enough salted water to cook a 5 pounds of elbow macaroni. Cook the macaroni, drain it well, and put it back in the pot that you cooked it in ,( or dump it into a sufficiently sized container)  and cover with the meat and sauce combination, and mix it until it is evenly blended.

That being said, even though this is called American Chop Suey in New England, people in other parts of the country know this dish as 'Casserole' ,( Midwest and upper midwest) Goulash,(parts of the Southern US) and even Slumgullion ( yeah, really).

Furthermore, if you have the spices and Worcestershire sauce on hand, $20-$25 will net you the rest of the ingredients to sufficiently feed a party sized gathering.

Add 2-3 cans of Kidney beans and triple the amount of chili powder and you will have Chili Mac. 



« Last Edit: August 15, 2008, 10:11:50 pm by South Munjoy »

Offline Melyn

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2008, 11:03:37 pm »
Nope! I'm from Mississippi, the state next to it. (:
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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2008, 11:20:14 pm »
Yogurt cheese is an interesting material.

I love yogurt cheese. We have a local place that makes it and markets a few different flavors, garlic, jalapeno, original (there might be one more, but i forget.) I prefer the garlic version, or the original in a chessecake.
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Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2008, 05:42:19 am »
yeah, we'd call that a big Goulash, here.  tho it does sound like a nice recipie for a meatloaf as well, sans mac

"fried 'gator" as in deep fried, pan seared, what?  and does the rice have a pound of butter melted in? (dang the cholesterol, full speed ahead!)

Offline Arbutus

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2008, 12:00:54 pm »
Fry the hamburg meat in a LARGE pot

Are you from western New England, perchance? :) I went to college in the Berkshires, and I've never heard anyone say "hamburg" except for the folks who lived in or near that region.

Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2008, 01:41:29 pm »
Fry the hamburg meat in a LARGE pot

Are you from western New England, perchance? :) I went to college in the Berkshires, and I've never heard anyone say "hamburg" except for the folks who lived in or near that region.

I'm from Portland, Maine. My mom's family is from Lewiston, and I spent a couple of years there when I was growing up. My grandparents were French Canadian, and they used the term as well.

Offline bomber

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2008, 03:47:36 am »
Well, around here (new jersey/tri-state area) we've got scrapple...

From Wiki:

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is cast into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until gelled. The proportions and seasoning are very much a matter of the region and the cook's taste.

Commercial scrapple often contains these traditional ingredients, with a distinctive flavor to each brand. A few manufacturers have introduced beef and turkey varieties and color the loaf to retain the traditional coloration derived from the original pork liver base.


And from the philly region, we have Cheesesteaks (cheesesteak  wit please!)  (cheese wiz wit fried onions for folks not familiar)

hm.. other then that we're a venerable mixing pot from PA. NY and MD (so we get it all from seafood, to country cookin, to big city flavor)
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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2008, 06:16:29 am »
hehe.  Scrapple is also a pennsylvania thing.