Author Topic: Local Delicacy Weirdness  (Read 7704 times)

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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2008, 03:06:10 am »
Well, around here (new jersey/tri-state area) we've got scrapple...

From Wiki:

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is cast into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until gelled.

Substitute whole oats for the cornmeal, ditch the liver, and Scrapple becomes White Pudding, continuing further add pigs blood, and you have Black Pudding. --Both are traditional Irish and Scots faire.

Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2008, 07:36:18 am »
where do you think we got the ideas from?  it's probably an "americanized" version of those traditional pieces of English Cuisine (english, in this case, lumping together the entirety of the british isles)

from the sound of it, though, this is why the rest of the world makes a face when someone says the words "English food"...they think it's all organ meats, I guess :P

Offline Timberwuff

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2008, 09:26:46 am »
Hm... some of the best food I had was in Vietnam. In this one city (I forget the name) they had a special called Cal Lao (Or that's how it was pronounced). It was essentially a soup-like broth in a bowl with lots of vegetables (the stringy white things (: ), Frito-like chips, pork, and lettuce I believe. It was delicious! But I don't think they serve it anywhere else. :(
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Offline South Munjoy

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2008, 11:00:45 am »
where do you think we got the ideas from?  it's probably an "americanized" version of those traditional pieces of English Cuisine (english, in this case, lumping together the entirety of the british isles)

from the sound of it, though, this is why the rest of the world makes a face when someone says the words "English food"...they think it's all organ meats, I guess :P

I agree with the evolution of white pudding to scrapple. OTOH, I think that people hung up on things like Steak & Kidney Pie, Eels in Aspic, Faggots, ( not what you think, it's meatballs made with Liver, served with gravy) as well as the names of some of the dishes, such as Bangers & Mash,( Sausages and gravy over Mashed potatoes) Bubble & Squeak, ( Mashes potatoes fried with boiled cabbage), Mushy Peas, ( Mashed green peas)  and Toad in a Hole( Mushy peas served inside mashed potatoes in place of gravy) .

Offline Siege

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2008, 01:08:55 pm »
You know, when my family made toad in the hole, it was bits of sausage links in a bread-like base, baked together.

Mashed peas for the lose, though. I like 'em whole.
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Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2008, 07:47:54 am »


I agree with the evolution of white pudding to scrapple. OTOH, I think that people hung up on things like Steak & Kidney Pie, Eels in Aspic, Faggots, ( not what you think, it's meatballs made with Liver, served with gravy) as well as the names of some of the dishes, such as Bangers & Mash,( Sausages and gravy over Mashed potatoes) Bubble & Squeak, ( Mashes potatoes fried with boiled cabbage), Mushy Peas, ( Mashed green peas)  and Toad in a Hole( Mushy peas served inside mashed potatoes in place of gravy) .

I got the idea of Bangers and mash from, of all places, "all creatures great and small" novels...when tristan had to cook!  poor sigfreid.
i was unded the impression Toad in the hole was the same as what we call "pigs in a blanket" (red-saucy meatballs wrapped in cabbage leaves).

we have a good one here that mum invented.  you fry up some burgers, boil them in tomato soup, then spread em over mash.

Offline Siege

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2008, 10:27:42 am »
And once again, British food turns into sausages and bread: this time, I know pigs in a blanket as sausage links wrapped in biscuit dough and baked.
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Offline Weisseman

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #32 on: October 19, 2008, 12:02:47 pm »
Seems to be a few dishes that are wrong here.

Toad in the hole is Sausages in yorkshire pudding.
Pigs in blankets is Sausages wrapped in bacon.
Bubble and squeak is fried mashed up vegetables (generally leftover veggies from the night before but doesn't have to be).

All are very tasty ^^ I tend to get all that round christmas though sometimes I have it for lunch at work if they have it.
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Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #33 on: October 19, 2008, 12:39:26 pm »
next time, guys, make sure to state the 'where" of England your at...the definitions probably change with each reigon in England alone (North Country, Midlands, west country, East Anglia, Cornwall...what do they really call london's area?), just like they do here.

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #34 on: October 19, 2008, 06:30:21 pm »
next time, guys, make sure to state the 'where" of England your at...the definitions probably change with each reigon in England alone (North Country, Midlands, west country, East Anglia, Cornwall...what do they really call london's area?), just like they do here.

 I've never come across a different definition to those yet and I've been all over the place here (I live in Hampshire, Southern England)

And London has lots of area names. Usually it gets lumped as it's own area in the end.
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Offline Tevnon

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2009, 03:07:05 pm »
Well, seeing as I live slightly less than an hourís drive from New Orleans we get a lot of Cajun foods around here. Probably the one which people from other parts of the country finds strangest is boiled crawfish. It isn't quite as "local" a food as it used to be, though, as Cajun cuisine has spread somewhat. Still, people up north have often never heard of eating crawfish, and even in other areas where crawfish as a food has spread it usually doesn't have the same cultural significance. Here it is common for a family or group of friends to get together and have a big outdoor crawfish boil a lot like people in other areas get together to grill or barbeque. Also, many company picnics and local festivals include a crawfish boil as a main event. The crawfish are boiled whole in lots of hot spices and crab boil along with stuff like corn on the cob and potatoes. Warning: if you ever attend a crawfish boil do not eat the corn unless you have an exceptionally high tolerance to hot foods. The corn really soaks up the hot spices like you wouldn't believe! The potatoes are O.K., though.
Anyway, to eat the crawfish you peal the tail and eat the meat inside. Many people also suck the juice from the heads. I know it sounds gross, but it does taste good. Sometimes you can get a little additional meat from the claws, but mainly it is all about the tail.
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Offline sniffswind

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2009, 08:33:06 am »
heh.  poked awake.

there's nothing unusual about crawfish.  used to have fun tryin to catch em even up here as a kid.  as far as I'm concerned, they're inland lobser, anyway.

more people know about Cajun cuisine than you think (trying not to fall into the accent).  it's getting used to the hot that probably takes a while.  I know someone up here that'd probably go nuts over hot corn.  this is a man that boils hot pepper rings in Italian dressing, ketchup, or, this year, mustard; and eats em as toppings on everything or straight up.

Offline Kay Alett

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Re: Local Delicacy Weirdness
« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2009, 10:51:34 am »
I'm from the backwoods redneck area of a small little town near Galveston Island. (Though you'd never think it to hear me since I don't have a southern accent) The closest thing we ever got to a 'delecacy' was chili cheese dogs. Ball Park hotdogs topped with wolf chili and kraft shredded cheese.

If there is an official dish for texans in that area I don't know what it is.
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