Author Topic: Is What You Wrote Being Read?  (Read 1236 times)

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Offline SetzerGambbini

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« on: June 28, 2004, 05:33:04 am »
Anyone that writes probably does a good deal of reading as well. We all know what a villain is and we all can identify a hero. Love, lust, loss. We write about what we know and it is the passion we have for writing that makes each piece we write perfect in its own way. The question is. When you write something, does the reader understand it as you meant it. If the way you invasion the story the same as the way the critics analyze it? What methods do you use to ensure that what you write is whatís being read?

Offline Andrew J

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2004, 09:12:35 pm »
Well, I haven't had very many readers for my "The Summer of 1399" story so far, but they at least seem to understand what I mean. I don't know how to write it so people get what you mean, it just happens. Do you have a problem with this, Setzer, in your readers? I know I might have some problems for book two of my saga (with my readers understanding me) as the general public would find two humanoids (felines, to be exact) having sex, like they're animals or something...but at least I have confidence that even though it would be my first "sex scene" ever written, I can do it fairly well.



"Pity this busy monster manunkind not..."
-e.e. cummings

"Go then. There are other worlds then these."
-John "Jake" Chambers

Offline SetzerGambbini

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2004, 09:22:17 pm »
I donít have any sites off the top of my head, any clean ones anyway. Writing about furs, anthros, anything. Itís about perspective. How do you see an anthro, what would go through their mind, how would they feel about existing in this world, how do you imagine a fur being created. Think about how an anthro would feel and think as well as it would act and reactÖ Looking at others work is great, but donít compare it to yours, because there isnít a basis for comparison.

Iím interested in reading that story of yours. Iím a writer myself, but I write more fantasy then furÖ

Offline Andrew J

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2004, 11:20:38 am »
Okay, thanks anyway though.

Ah, I see, you meant how would the anthro characters act and such, how would you make them realistic and such. Okay, well, I made sure I made mine like people but with some animal instincts, for instance, my foxes enjoy eating grapes and all the other things that they normally would. And in another instance, my jaguar doctor checks this wolf for sickness, some of things he does is check the wolf's tail (to see if it's limp or otherwise not acting right), his pelt for any falling out fur (which would mean a disease) and other things. Plus, when having them sit down or such, I have the narration mention them having to sit down carefully (if they're in a human house) because the chair doesn't have room for their tail, and they usually let it hang out the open side of the chair. Not to mention such things as having a feline character who sees a human in his point of the narration describe him as "having none of the fur that Humans called stubble," etc. You get the idea.

I got all the ideas for above stuff and my world from reading furry books that have been published, and a few that haven't.

As for writing, I'm serious about it and consider "The Summer of 1399" to be fantasy, as it appeals to non-furry readers as well as fursons (actually, I've only had one person who likes animal characters read it, and the other few were just fantasy readers.) I agree with you, I like fantasy a lot, in fact, the reason I started my story was that other than Redwall (which, other than the talking animals had no fantasy elements) there was no furry fantasy unless it took place on Earth amongst humans with normal animals that could think. So I set out to create my own world, one that both furries and fantasy fans would like.

I'm glad you're interested in reading, as I could always use more readers. You can take my hand and
 enter the land of Skarder here. Oh yeah, if you have a story you want read, tell me, as I have a LOT of free time, and have spent the last few week submitting 36 reviews at Fictionpress, not short ones, but multiple paragraphs.




"Pity this busy monster manunkind not..."
-e.e. cummings

"Go then. There are other worlds then these."
-John "Jake" Chambers

Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2004, 12:08:58 am »
I think Andrew J summed it up pretty nicely.

There's two things you generally need to do when writing about an unfamiliar species.  The first is to write a few paragraphs about the species itself- it doesn't need to be something you'll include in the book; just enough that you'll understand how his/her mind might work.  The other (and more easier) method is to just think of them as humans with hightened sense or additional features.  The important thing is not to have them say "I can smell better" or "my tail was in the way-" if its truly their mentality, the statement would be "I can't imagine how the humans couldn't smell that" or "why wasn't there any room for my tail?"  Their only enhancements in terms of our own mentality- the characters have had them since birth and therefore thinking in terms of their absence should be what is difficult for them.

The other thing you might want to consider is letting the setting dictate their behavior as opposed to attempting to mimic what is typical of their feral equivalent.  Nobody will lecture you for creating a race of warrior chipmunks if they became that way because they live right next to a little slice of Hell.

Offline Soulsky

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2004, 07:04:23 pm »
This may be a little off topic, but it's a good, related point.  I've been writing a bit and lately I've gotten into some classes and workshopping.  I've worked with a lot of non-furry people on my writing and discovered a few things.

You have to be a LOT more clear and descriptive on anthropomorphic traits in furry characters than some original think to.  Within the furry culture, a lot of descriptions, habits, etc. become known really well, and it may seem like you're bogging down the story if you put in too much description and explanation.  Don't feel that way.  I made the mistake of skimping, and they couldn't understand a damn thing.  It was all too blurry.  I had to go back and redo the 'insignificant' details that, as a furry, were fairly obvious, and write them in.  On the revision, they understood and enjoyed it a lot better.

I may be the only one who makes this mistake, but meh. ^_x;

As for people understanding what you're trying to convey, it depends. If it's well written (we'll go with the benefeit of the doubt here) your main points will get across.  If you try to imply things, you might lose meanings, and symbolism loses even more.    Overall, well, it's almost impossible for someone to understand every meaning that you write.  I guess you have to decide what's important and make it more obvious.

As a reader, though, I think it's amusing to speculate on what a writer really means.  Sometimes it's the examination that's more enlightening than the actual message.

I've talked too much.  '<img'>  '<img'>  '<img'>  Ciao~

Offline Andrew J

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Is What You Wrote Being Read?
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2004, 08:51:49 pm »
Yes, Soulsky makes a good point. Though I always write so anyone can understand my stories, saying I haven't had anyone really read them that was a furry (which is part of the reason I came to this board.)
"Pity this busy monster manunkind not..."
-e.e. cummings

"Go then. There are other worlds then these."
-John "Jake" Chambers